Journey to a beautiful amazing city- Nah Trang, Vietnam

|

Normally, I begin my postings with a snapshot of the place I visited and a little description of the city. I was too exhausted to explore Nah Trang when I arrived, so I don’t have much to say about it except that it has an excellent Mexican restaurant/taco stand. It’s a coastal town with a lot of interesting things to do. I only have three shots of it, and they’re not great. I’ll put them at the end of the article. The tour itself was the main highlight of my trip to Nah Trang.

The journey from Da Lat to Nah Trang was spectacular. Although there was a lot of mountain climbing, my poor tiny bike handled it admirably. My bike’s motor wasn’t particularly powerful or old, but it got me up and down the mountains without any difficulty.

A large number of greenhouses may be found just outside of Da Lat. I couldn’t figure out what was growing inside them. Greenhouses aren’t common in Vietnam, so seeing them in this area was unusual.

The roads I traveled were mainly tranquil with low traffic, as are most routes outside of major cities. Highway QL1 along the shore is a popular route for driving to northern Vietnam. However, because that roadway is so congested, I avoided it like the plague. Instead, I generally traveled north via inland routes. For me, riding in heavy traffic is not fun or enjoyable at all.

I saw this pair on their way to work on the road. It’s fantastic that they can bring their dogs along. The person standing next to their scooter is actually restrained.

It was a beautiful day to ride. I mentioned in my Facebook post for today that it was quite cold in the highlands. Because I didn’t have any long sleeve shirts to keep the sun off my arms, I was forced to wear my rain jacket in the scorching heat. It also served as a means of keeping me warm. Rain was one thing it wasn’t very good at. It was an expensive European rain jacket that was useless in the rain.

It was a beautiful day to ride. I mentioned in my Facebook post for today that it was quite cold in the highlands. Because I didn’t have any long sleeve shirts to keep the sun off my arms, I was forced to wear my rain jacket in the scorching heat. It also served as a means of keeping me warm. Rain was one thing it wasn’t very good at. It was an expensive European rain jacket that was useless in the rain.

I traveled through a slew of charming small towns and villages.

I took a quick rest at these structures. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen anything like it in the rest of Vietnam.

After a while, I began ascending the mountains. The trees on this side of the mountain were primarily evergreen (coniferous). The flora on the other side of the mountain was lush, deep jungle.

The road down the mountain was quite steep, and I prayed my bike’s brakes were equal to the task. I came to a halt at an observation point to take some shots.

While I was relaxing here, a van with two visitors came to a halt. I was always grateful that I was on my scooter whenever I saw other tourists in vans or buses. I was ecstatic to have my own mode of transportation and the freedom to stop wherever I pleased. Alternatively, to take a detour down a road that seemed fascinating. Riding a scooter was less comfortable than driving a van, and it took a lot longer and required a lot more effort. But it felt so liberating. It’s difficult to put into words the feeling of freedom and exhilaration that comes with being on a bike with an entire country front of me to explore.

Although the view of the rainforest valley was breathtaking, my camera was not adequate to the challenge of capturing it.

Riding through the bush was a refreshing change. It appealed to me more than the parched climate of the Saigon suburbs. And because the evergreen forest is so similar to the woodlands in the area where I grew up, I was already familiar with that type of ecosystem. For the first time in my life, I was in the jungle, which appeared strange and intriguing.

As I was leaving the mountains, I had to stop and try to photograph some amazing sights.

Scooters stuffed to the brim with goods would become commonplace, but I was always astonished by how much stuff Vietnamese people could transport on their scooters.

This lady is transporting a cargo that would normally necessitate the use of a pickup truck in the United States. I tried carrying some extra goods on my bike a couple of times and found it really difficult to maintain control of the machine. Managing things like these on a scooter takes a lot of skill. It’s really impressive.

I passed a group of kids who appeared to be getting out of school. Though, because all of the youngsters generally wear uniforms, it’s possible that this was something else. Regardless, the children were ready to exclaim “Hello there! “How are you doing?” or “Can you tell me your name?” “.. They’d always wanted to put their English skills to the test. The greetings I received on a daily basis in Vietnam made me fall in love with the country. People in Laos normally smile or say hello, but I usually have to initiate the greeting. In Vietnam, parents would greet me by waving their infant’s hand. And there would be a slew of people waving or smiling. It became clear that this was the friendliest place I’d ever visited.

Everyone rode down the opposite side after walking their bikes up the hill.

I made a pit break in a little village for some refreshments. You can see how much luggage I had on my bike. My primary backpack was fastened to the passenger seat. I also carried a little “day bag” backpack that I put between my legs or wore in front of me. I traveled with a bluetooth speaker attached to my bag and listened to music.

The village where I paused was fairly typical of the towns I was passing through.

At roadside stands like this, coconut water and sugarcane juice are popular drinks.

When I first tried this Recover drink, I was pleasantly impressed. It was flavored with salty lemon! It’s not sweet at all, and it’s a little fizzy. It was fantastic! I tried to track it down, but during my four months in Vietnam, I never saw it again. The flavor is inspired by a popular Vietnamese drink called “Chanh mui,” which is essentially lemonade with salt instead of sugar. The lemons are actually preserved in the salt. It was one of my favorites, and I would get it anytime it was available.

On the journey to the seaside, the road leveled down after leaving the highlands.

The area around Nah Trang gradually got increasingly inhabited and developed.

I landed at Nah Trang at long last. I didn’t notice anything that set it apart from other cities.

I settled into a motel and went on foot in search of food.

This is what I said about Nah Trang on Facebook.

In Vietnam, food would be an issue for me. I don’t consider myself a fussy eater, yet I am one. In my diet, I don’t like bones, skin, intestines, animal heads, or feet. When animals are consumed in Vietnam, very little is wasted. Soup is only eaten in my nation when people are unwell or preparing to eat actual meal. Pho didn’t strike me as a meal.
I enjoy pho now that I’ve returned home, and when I went back to Vietnam for a short visit, I loved practically all of the food I ate there and attempted to eat as much local food as possible. But, on my first trip to Vietnam, I didn’t like for the food until a resident in Danang exposed me to some incredible delicacies. But I’ll talk about that in a later piece.

This concludes my account of my trip to Nah Trang. I look forward to seeing you in the next post!




Leave a reply