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The first trip to Paris

Paris is one of the world’s most visited cities. This, in my opinion, is due to its appeal, accessibility, and how well it is sold. I’d want to talk about my experiences in this vast urban area. It’s not the first time I’ve visited Paris and noticed how it has maintained its style, grace, and charm. Furthermore, throughout the majority of my visit, I was blessed with beautiful weather.

My hotel was conveniently located near Charles De Gaulle Square. Because of its star shape, it was previously known as Place de l’Etoile (star in French). This square is known for the Arc de Triomphe, which commemorates the victory of the French army during Napoleon I’s reign. The Champs Elysées begins here. One of Paris’ most famous boulevards, lined with stores, movies, and cafés. It was a beautiful sunny day to begin my tour of the city in Trocadero.

Going up the stairwell between the two towers and saw the Parisian emblem. The city’s tallest structure, whose name is derived from the architect who designed it. The Eiffel Tower is a 322 m tall iron structure whose top dominates the entire neighborhood.

The weather made it possible to have a fantastic perspective of Paris.

Continue to take advantage of the weather. I strolled till I reached rue de Grenelle, where I went to see the Hotel des Invalides and the Army Historical Museum. One of the world’s most extensive collections of guns, artillery, paintings, pieces, and decorating emblems. From the Middle Ages through the aftermath of World War II, a journey through French military history.

It is said that Napoleon’s grave is located here.

Some of the things in this collection are also his. Before his death, he was in an asylum at St. Helena, which is documented in the museum.

The next day was likewise bright and sunny. Even if the weather was wonderful, I would go to the Musée d’Orsay, Paris’ second largest museum after the Louvre. The building was completed in time for the 1900 World’s Fair. The museum, which opened in 1986, depicts the development of western world art from 1848 to the first two decades of the twentieth century.

The ground floor was divided into many rooms (each dedicated to a distinct era, style, or group of artists), as seen below:
-The decorative arts: 1850-1880 -Sculpture: 1850-1880 -The decorative arts: 1850-1880 -The decorative arts: Orientalism- Manet and Cezanne in 1860- Degas in 1870 – Realism period – Toulouse – Lautrec – Symbolisme – Barbizon school – Herbert and the French artists in Italy – Daumier and Millet – Accademisme

The following floor has the following amenities:
Decorative painting and nabis
1880-1900 Sculpture – Gaugin and Van Gogh – Neo-Impressionisme – New Art – Symbolism – Naturalism

The following floor has the following amenities:
Decorative painting and nabis
1880-1900 Sculpture – Gaugin and Van Gogh – Neo-Impressionisme – New Art – Symbolism – Naturalism

The following floor has the following amenities:
Decorative painting and nabis
1880-1900 Sculpture – Gaugin and Van Gogh – Neo-Impressionisme – New Art – Symbolism – Naturalism

Japanism and Ecletism in the Decorative Arts
The following ones include:
Scandinavian, German, Austrian, and British decorative arts
The last floor is solely dedicated to Impressionism artists such as Monet, Manet, Degas, Cézanne, Sisley, and others of the era.

To be honest, I am not an expert on art, but I enjoy learning about it. This museum requires at least a half-day visit, but it is well worth it. I went outside and walked to the most famous Gothic cathedral in France, which is located in Paris. Notre Dame de Paris (Our Lady in French) is a Unesco World Heritage Site.

Three portails may be found on the western façade. The central one is the doorway of judgment, which, according to St. Matthew’s gospel, represents the final judgment. The Virgin Portail’s left side depicts Mary’s death and ascension into Paradise. The Saint Anne Portal, which depicts the Virgin Mary with the child, is located on the right side.

In the northern part of the interior, there is a colorful rose window. The illustration of the evolution of gothic cathedrals in France was also fascinating to me.

The Sainte-Chapelle, located next to Notre Dame, is another example of Gothic architecture. From the 10th to the 14th century, the Palais de la Cite served as the seat and palace of royal power. The Conciergerie (caretaker’s lodge) and the Saint Chapelle were both situated in this structure ( Saint Chapel). These are the sole visible remnants of France’s oldest royal palace. The last one was constructed between 1242 and 1248 in accordance with King Louis IX’s request to contain the relics of Christ’s Passion.

Since the 4th century, the Emperor of Costantinople had had these Holy Relics (an object or portion of the body that belonged to a saint). They were purchased by Louis IX, and the Saint Chapelle became a symbol of divinity and the second capital of Christianity at the time, after Jerusalem. The structure was damaged during the Revolutionary War, and it was restored in 1846 to its current look.

The upper and lower chapels make up the Saint Chapelle’s sanctuaries. A statue of Virgin Mary stands at the lower chapel’s portal. Polychrome ornaments, such as the carved design in the porch, adorn the interior. Struts connecting the aisle columns to the lateral walls support the low vault, which is adorned with twelve medallions representing the Apostles. The vault on azure on the column alternates with the purple-colored tower, creating an appealing juxtaposition.

The Latin Quarter (Quarter Latin) near Place de la Sorbonne was the next stop on my itinerary. The church, unfortunately, was closed.

Take a look at St. Genevieve’s church on Pantheon Square afterwards. A neoclassical tomb that also houses the Saint’s relics.

To round up my day of sightseeing, I went to Place Vendome and saw the green column commemorating the Battle of Austerlitz, which was erected by Napoleon the first.

To round up my day of sightseeing, I went to Place Vendome and saw the green column commemorating the Battle of Austerlitz, which was erected by Napoleon the first.

In the following piece, I’ll continue talking about my time in Paris.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Warm Regards

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